EOS Introduces FORMIGA P 110

Additive manufacturing (AM) continues to chug along, building up momentum with each new technological innovation. Sometimes it’s a new material or AM system, other times it’s a refinement of an already existing product. Continuing research and development is what will bring 3D printing to the forefront of prototyping and manufacturing.

For that reason, Rapid Ready is always happy to look at a new AM system. EOS (company profile) has released the FOMIGA P 110, an updated version of the P 100. When you think of laser sintering, it may be in the context of working with metal. EOS has put the technology to use sintering plastic, using a 30 watt, CO2 laser.

EOS FORMIGA P110

EOS' newest plastic laser sintering system, the FORMIGA P110. Courtesy of EOS.

“FORMIGA-quality’ has already become a quality label for the additive manufacturing of plastics,” said Peter Klink, EVP Sales at EOS. This ongoing development of the P 100 product line will help us to further extend our lead in the compact class.”

According to the company, the P 110 has been developed to build small print runs, and parts or products with a complex internal geometry, such as medical devices. Among the new features of the new system are a four-channel heating and use of a single-point pyrometer. EOS also says the FORMIGA P 110 has improved stability and reproducibility.

On the technical side, EOS’ new AM system has a build envelope of 200 x 250 x 330 mm (7.9 x 9.8 x 13 in), with a build speed of up to 20 mm height/h (0.79 in/h). The P 110 offers a layer thickness of 0.06 mm (0.0024 in), 0.1 mm (0.0039 in), 0.12 mm (0.0047 in), depending on material (either polyamide or polystyrene).

“The additional parameter sets ‘Balance 1.0′ (120 µm layer thickness) and ‘Top Quality 1.0′ (60 µm layer thickness) allow an even more detailed and flexible production,” said Hannes Kuhn, managing director of Kuhn-Stoff GmbH and a pilot customer for the FORMIGA P 110. “The increased build rate rounds off the advantages compared with the FORMIGA P 100.”

Below you’ll find a video about plastic laser sintering.

Source: EOS

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