Arcam

Arcam Q20 Targets Aerospace Industry

The narrative for additive manufacturing (AM) in 2014 seems to be centered around a change from prototyping to end-use products. That isn’t to say AM doesn’t still see plenty of use in rapid prototyping, it just means companies have begun to investigate how the technology can be turned to other purposes. One industry that is showing a large amount of interest in AM-built parts is aerospace.

3D printing can build lighter parts with less waste than other manufacturing methods, which makes it extremely attractive for building aerospace parts. While nearly any metal AM system can be turned to production of aerospace parts, a few companies are building 3D printers specifically with aerospace in mind. Arcam is looking to tap into the aerospace market with its Arcam Q20 EBM system. Continue reading

Arcam Releases the Arcam Q10

Although additive manufacturing (AM) has been around for 20+ years, it’s fair to say that it’s just now beginning to make its mark. As the technology advances, some machines are becoming more specialized and targeted at specific types of industry, rather than just general use. While it’s true that even a specialized AM system is still going to have multiple uses, tweaking it just a little bit for specific purposes is a good business model.

With that we come to Arcam’s new electron beam melting system (EBM), the Arcam Q10. As is true for all EBM machines (ASTM directed energy deposition), the Q10 uses an electron beam to melt powdered metals. Commonly used metals include titanium and cobalt-chrome. This new design is meant to replace the A1 for orthopedic manufacturing. Continue reading

Rapid Ready Roundup: Arcam, Standards, Face Jugs and CES

In the course of my diligent efforts to keep you good people up to date on the state of additive manufacturing (AM), I come across many interesting news items. I’ll gather them up every so often and present them in a Rapid Ready Roundup (like this one). You can find the last Roundup here.

Let’s start today’s Roundup with a quick look at the aerospace industry and AM. Arcam has reported a deal with Italian aerospace component manufacturer Avio for the delivery of six new electron beam melting systems. The deal, worth more than $46 million, will result in a new facility focused on creating titanium aluminide parts using AM. Continue reading

Rapid Ready Roundup: Fujifilm Kiosks, DARPA’s iFAB, Arcam Titanium 2 and Proof 3D Printing is Cool

In the course of my diligent efforts to keep you good people up to date on the state of additive manufacturing, I come across many interesting news items. I’ll gather them up once every few weeks and present them in a Rapid Ready Roundup (like this one). You can find the last Roundup here.

I keep hearing word that print is dead. From what I can tell, print is merely transitioning to a different medium. Some of that is electronic, and some is via a service arrangement called print-on-demand (POD). POD allows a customer to select a book they’d like to have a dead-tree version of and have it printed just for them. This saves book space and keeps overhead low.

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Tennesse Students Use 3D Printing to Build Robots for FIRST

How many people out there actually enjoyed their science fair projects? I know I did (and I have the medals to prove it), and I didn’t even have the amazing tools available to kids these days. While not exactly a science fair project, students from eight schools in Knox County, Tennesse are using 3D printing as part of their creation process for the FIRST Robotics Competition.

FIRST is a national robotics competition that pits students in grades 9-12 from more than 2,000 schools. Other than the feeling of accomplishment that comes with competing in this sort of event, competitors gain access to nearly $14 million in college scholarships. Sponsors for the event include Autodesk, Microsoft, PTC and Texas Instruments.

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