Education

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Develops New Additive Manufacturing Process

Our electric grid would look very different if Nikola Tesla hadn’t looked at Thomas Edison’s plans for direct current and thought he could do better. In a similar vein, although it might seem like there is an additive manufacturing (AM) process for almost any type of production, there’s always room for fresh ideas. In this case, the new idea comes in the form of a different method for using an existing technology.

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a way to use electrophoretic deposition (EPD) for AM in a new process the lab is calling light-directed electrophoretic deposition. EPD itself has been used for almost 100 years as a way of coating materials through deposition. As an example, new cars can be primed using EPD by moving a positively charged car body into a negatively charged dunk tank. Continue reading

Rapid Ready Roundup: Stratasys, 3D Systems, Project Ara

In the course of my diligent efforts to keep you good people up to date on the state of additive manufacturing (AM), I come across many interesting news items. I’ll gather them up every so often and present them in a Rapid Ready Roundup (like this one). You can find the last Roundup here.

Today we’ll start with a couple pieces of news from Stratasys. First up, the company has released a new AM material called Endur. The new material is a simulated polypropylene for use with all Objet EdenV, Objet Connex, Objet500 Connex3 and Objet 30Pro AM systems. According to the company, Endur offers both high impact resistance and elongation at break, and has a heat-deflection temperature up to 129°F / 54°C (HDT @ 0.45MPa per ASTM D-648-06). Continue reading

Stratasys Announces Finalists for Annual Extreme Redesign Contest

It’s probably fair to say that people around the world are beginning to expect great things from additive manufacturing (AM). With each advance in technology and expansion in application, 3D printing becomes further ingrained in manufacturing, and inspires creativity in the design and development process. One method to ensure the next generation of engineers and designers push the boundaries even further is by introducing students to AM.

Stratasys promotes 3D printing to students from middle school through college with its annual Extreme Redesign contest. This year’s contest received over 600 entries from around the world, including 12 different countries. Those entries were whittled down to 10 finalists from different categories (middle school/high school engineering, college engineering and art/architecture) and this year also included a bonus finalist in extreme sports. Continue reading

Rapid Ready Roundup: FIRST, Aerodef, Firearms, and Hershey’s

In the course of my diligent efforts to keep you good people up to date on the state of additive manufacturing (AM), I come across many interesting news items. I’ll gather them up every so often and present them in a Rapid Ready Roundup (like this one). You can find the last Roundup here.

We’ll start today’s Roundup with news from FIRST. If you haven’t previously heard of the organization, FIRST promotes STEM education with a number of different programs, the most popular of which is probably the robotics competition. Continue reading

Rapid Ready Roundup: Mcor Technologies, 3D Systems, Hubble and Elementary

In the course of my diligent efforts to keep you good people up to date on the state of additive manufacturing (AM), I come across many interesting news items. I’ll gather them up every so often and present them in a Rapid Ready Roundup (like this one). You can find the last Roundup here.

For our first Roundup of the 2014, we’ll start by looking across the pond to Ireland. Mcor Technologies has been given a boost with a €15m (a little over $20 million) investment from Silicon Valley venture capitalists. According to the company, the investment will be used to expand and scale up the business. Continue reading